Modern Jew-Killing Accusations Against Poles a Repetition of Nazi Propaganda…


Modern Jew-Killing Accusations Against Poles a Repetition of Nazi Propaganda. Looting and Grave Robbery Done By Jews as Well as Poles

  • The Holocaust Kingdom by Alexander Donat -Published June 1978 by Talman Co. Edition Language: English.

Alexander Donat recounts his experiences in the Warsaw Ghetto, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (notably the role of the Z.Z.W.; pp. 107-108 and 143), Maidanek (including its cruel Jewish kapos; p. 193), other locations, and finally Germany not long before the time of liberation. Donat doesn’t think much of German „repentance” following the Nazi defeat (p. 291).

IRONY: NAZI GERMAN PROPAGANDA IS NOW BEING REPEATED BY POLE-ACCUSING JEWS

Interestingly, a „different” kind of German told Donat that Polish nationalist guerillas ostensibly fight Germans but actually go around killing fugitive Jews (pp. 225-226). Evidently, these oft-repeated tales originate from German propaganda–intended in part to discourage Jewish escapes. Now we get very much the same message from too many Holocaust materials! So Holocaust educators are making common cause with the Nazis against Poles. For shame!

LOOTING, GRAVE ROBBERY CONDUCTED BY JEWS AS WELL AS POLES

In contrast to the one-sided attention devoted, in modern Holocaust materials, to Polish informers, blackmailers, and looters, Donat broadens this to include Jews, as in the Ghetto: „Many highly-placed occupation authorities…were officially and unofficially involved in looting. So were some Jewish criminals who tipped Germans off about the best places to plunder, or threatened Jews that they would do so in order to blackmail them.” (p. 9). „Gentile Poles were among the looters, and last, but not least, was the looting done by the employees of the Ghetto undertaker, Pinkiert, who robbed the corpses of the slain. Since more than 10,000 people were killed or died during the Resettlement Operation, the undertakers’ haul was rich.” (p. 72)

JEWISH-NAZI COLLABORATION

As for the infamous Jewish police, Donat comments: „Actual power was now in the hands of the Jewish Ghetto police who roamed the streets like wild beasts, seizing men, women, and children with increasing brutality.” (p. 61)

AN IRONY TO THE AUSCHWITZ CARMELITE CONVENT CONTROVERSY

For all the talk, in the wake of the Auschwitz Carmelite Convent controversy, of the Cross being absolutely foreign, if not offensive, to Judaism, Donat and his fellow Jews have no problem juxtaposing Jewish suffering with Golgotha (p. 83, 103), Calvary (p. 152), and the Crucifixion of the Christ inside us (pp. 230-231).

JEWISH GERMANOPHILIA AND JEWISH PASSIVITY: WHY POLES OFTEN DID NOT THINK MUCH OF JEWISH RESISTANCE

In focusing on „Jewish passivity”, Donat recounts the entrenched pro-German mindset of most Jews: „For generations, East European Jews had looked to Berlin as the symbol of law, order, and culture. We could not now believe that the Third Reich was a government of gangsters embarked on a program of genocide `to solve the Jewish problem in Europe’.” (p. 103).

In this regard, Donat admits that the Poles had a better grasp of German intentions. He recounts how a Pole tried to buy a coat from the Jew, but the Jew insisted that he’d still need it, prompting the Pole to respond: „They’re going to make soap out of you anyway. Sell the coat to me. Why should a nice coat like that go to waste?” (p. 123). Donat comments: „Such things were said neither as a taunt nor in hatred. The facts were all too evident: the Jews were too stupid to understand their situation and it was necessary to hammer it home to them. After the January [1943] resistance, however, we occasionally heard Poles say things like, `Bravo, little Yids! That’s the way. Stand right up to them!’ Or, `They’re eating you for lunch and saving us for dinner!’ Or, `As soon as those sons-of-bitches have finished you off, it’ll be our turn.'” (pp. 123-124). The foregoing alone refutes the claim that the Poles generally felt „friendly neutrality” towards the Germans’ extermination of the Jews. We also see that seemingly-callous Polish remarks weren’t necessarily that and, in any case, Poles used comparable remarks to refer to themselves.

THE GERMAN-IMPOSED DEATH PENALTY AND THEN THE GERMAN-IMPOSED DEATH PENALTY

Donat makes the ridiculous argument (echoed more recently by Jan T. Gross) that the Poles weren’t afraid of the German-imposed death penalty when it came to such things as the possession of radios, but were only afraid of the death penalty when it came to hiding Jews (p. 230). Common sense alone teaches that hiding a verboten object (radio) was much less risky than hiding a verboten human being! Furthermore the risk-taking Pole knew that, if caught, he had a good chance of being freed with a well-placed bribe for radio-possession, but not for housing a Jew.

 

 

Jan Peczkis

 

Published with the author’s permission.

 

  • Title image: „The Holocaust Kingdom” by Alexander Donat part of cover / selected by wg.pco

Polish-Club-Online-PCO-logo-2, 2018.09.13.